Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Sawako Lilly's October Kimono

For the month of October, Sawako Lilly models her autumn furisode (long sleeved) kimono, direct from Japan, made by the talented local artisan Suzuya Endo. Each kimono is one of a kind and unique, made from antique silk kimonos! ^_^ It's a sea of falling leaves and fall flowers on a backdrop of blue sky. I adore the details on this kimono, both the large patterns of the old, traditional cart, as well as the smaller patterns.


The star like colored leaves are momiji leaves, which is the Japanese maple tree and a very classic pattern for colder month kimonos.

The small clusters of flowers are kiku or chrysanthemums, which is the symbol of the Japanese Emperor. It is considered an autumn/winter flower and is also a very common motif on kimonos.

The obi matches the kiku or chrysanthamum pattern, but contrasts with a light green, grass colored backgroup, making it stand out boldly and compliments the sky backdrop of furisode. The obijime (tie) is a light lavender and the obiage (scarf which hides some of the knots from tying the obi) is a lovely deep orange and shibori dyed (the round squares dying pattern which is traditionally the pattern for the scarf worn with the furisode formal level kimono).

Details of front panel:

The back of the kimono is not any less detailed. The patterns and designs of the front carry over to the back as well and we see more kiku, traditional carts, momiji, and even botan or peonies.

Close up of the wheel of a traditional cart sitting in a bed of botan. I love the details of the tiny kiku on the edges of the wheels:

The obi musubi (knot) is in the fukura sukume design (plump sparrow). It is a formal musubi and usually only worn with furisode kimonos.

Close up of the back top of the right sleeve

Close up of kiku and botan on the bottom panels of the back of the furisode.

Small momiji patterns hidden near the nape of the neck:

The furisode without the obi belt. You can see that the patterns and designs don't stop but continue over the body with more kiku.

Close up of kiku across the front of the body of the furisode, normally hidden by the obi belt.

Kimonos are always worn with the left flap over the right. If you wear it right side over left, it means you are dead and in your burial kimono, the only time where the kimono is worn right on top of left. Even so, I like that this furisode still has a beautiful traditional cart hidden on the right panel. Many kimonos have small, secret patterns that are hidden when fully dressed, and only known to the wearer. It's one of the exciting, and fun things about kimonos that I love! ^_^

11 comments:

  1. Is Chinese new year today, or is it on January 31st (that's when google says it is, I just searched Chinese new year 2014 and it came up that is when it is.) Just wondering.

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  2. That is beautiful! does she takes orders? I would love to have matching ones made for my daughter and her doll for the cherry blossom festival next year.

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    1. Thank you trishideias! Unfortunately she only makes kimonos for dolls because she makes them out of antique, vintage kimonos that are no longer worn.

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    2. For trishideias: Folkwear has a pattern for a kimono, sized for adult and children. If you sew, you could make one for your daughter.

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  3. That is ridiculously gorgeous! LOVE!

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    1. Thank you! I was also floored when I first saw it at just the level of details on it! ^_^

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  4. It's just like a full-size one, only in miniature! I've wanted a kimono for ages, and this one is just amazing! I love how bright the colours are, even though the fabric is antique.

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    1. Definitely! By large and far, these kimonos are the most realistic and accurate I have ever seen made for an AG sized doll, and because of that I've been taking care of them and storing them the way I store my own human sized kimonos too. :D

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  5. Where did you get this kimono? I mean like does she have an online store or something?

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    1. As far as I know, no. I have a friend who works in Japan and buys them on my behalf.

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  6. Felicity and Samantha have been after me to add an Asian girl and now that they have seen this, there will be no living with them until I do. Would your friend make another one of these? I have made one for smaller dolls, but not out of authentic kimono fabrics. Absolutely wonderful.

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